Immigration Lawyer Michael Niren Quoted: Bill C-43

The recently proposed Bill C-43, the Faster Removal of Foreign Criminals Act, will ensure that Canada has some of the strictest deportation laws among the Westernized world. 

For example, as of right now permanent residents in Canada who are convicted of a crime and serving sentences less than two years are given the right to appeal a deportation order. But the appeals process is backlogged, so the new bill would make it so that permanent residents that are given sentences of six months or more won’t be able to appeal.

Our own immigration lawyer Michael Niren was interviewed by ipolitics.ca, saying “I think we’d be more in line with other countries, even the United States…” – The United States has some of the strictest deportation laws in the world – “Canada is catching up in that regard. Is that necessarily a good thing? No.”

In fact, a US immigration attorney interviewed for the same article said the new Canadian law seems tougher than the United States’ deportation law, where foreign criminals can fight their deportation for up to a year.

“We have to remember that we do live in a democratic country and the way in which we treat, whether they’re domestic criminals or foreign criminals, will be looked at by other nations,” Niren said. “Canada, I think, is going to opposite direction. We’re very enforcement-minded, very protectionist.”

 

Any information provided here does not constitute legal advice and is intended for general information only. Should you require legal advise, you are encouraged to contact a lawyer directly. All blog postings are public and are not subject to solicitor/client confidentially. Case results depend on a variety of factors unique to each case, and case results do not guarantee or predict a similar result in any further case undertaken by the lawyer.

Tags: Bill C-43 deportation from canada permanent resident status

About Michael Niren

Michael is a graduate of Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto. He is a member of the Law Society of Upper Canada, the Canadian Bar Association’s Citizenship and Immigration Section and the American Bar Association. He is frequently called upon to appear in the media to discuss Canadian and US immigration issues effecting North Americans. He has been interviewed by Canada AM, CTV, Canada News Net, the Globe and Mail and the Toronto Star and has given lectures on immigration topics overseas.

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