Immigrating to Canada from the Philippines

immigrating-to-canada-from-philippines-niren-associatesOne of the largest success stories to come out of Canadian immigration in the past century is that of Filipino migrants who have been coming into Canada from the Philippines for over sixty years. The Philippines tends to be one of the top four countries for migration into Canada on a yearly basis, but recently has climbed past China and India for the number two seed behind the United States.

The struggling state of the economy in the Philippines has made migration an attractive option as the large number of college graduates (just under three-quarters of a million) have only a small chance of finding employment in their home nation.

Why the Philippines?

In comparison to other migrants from different countries, several factors make Filipino immigrants more likely to find employment.

  • Higher levels of job skills in comparison to other migrants
  • More education, with higher numbers holding degrees
  • Better English-language skills than most migrants

These combine to make Filipino immigrants a favourable hiring block. With existing deficits in Canadian businesses such as Ontario health care, many Filipinos are finding easy employment in specializations that they would be unable to find in the Philippines. Unlike other immigrants that have suffered more than native citizens as a result of the recession, migrants from the Philippines are thriving.

Filipinos in Canada

While migrants from China and India are well-known for creating ethnic neighborhoods and communities that resist cultural homogenization with other Canadian cultures, Filipinos have proven much more adept at blending into their surroundings and leaving much less of a profile. No city in Canada has a “Filipino Town” to compare with the Chinese districts of Vancouver or the Indian neighborhoods of Toronto; only a few neighborhoods across the country have a population density higher than the national average. With only one Filipino-Canadian having been elected to the national Parliament, there is very little indication that these immigrants have become such a large block altogether.

The Gains of the Philippines Migrants

One of the largest advantages of Filipino employment is their role in caring industry. As one example, the Live-In Caregiver Program that offers live-in care for children and the elderly has a workforce that is made up of over ninety percent Filipinos. Some Canadian sociologists have called them “servants of globalization” because they separate from their families in order to work for wealthy families. Their efforts are selfless but quite fruitful — each year over a billion dollars flows into the Philippines from Canada, accounting for over ten percent of the nation’s GDP. What’s more, the immigrants are showing incredible upward mobility, with nearly ninety percent of first-wave children gaining university degrees, one of the highest figures of race and education in the entire country.

Any information provided here does not constitute legal advice and is intended for general information only. Should you require legal advise, you are encouraged to contact a lawyer directly. All blog postings are public and are not subject to solicitor/client confidentially. Case results depend on a variety of factors unique to each case, and case results do not guarantee or predict a similar result in any further case undertaken by the lawyer.

Tags: Immigrate to Canada Live in Caregiver Program Philippines

About Fadi Minawi

Fadi is a graduate of the University of Toronto and the University of Toledo College of Law. He is called to the New York State Bar and is registered as a Foreign Legal Consultant with the Law Society of Upper Canada. He is a member of the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) and is currently serving as the Media Liaison for the Canadian Chapter of AILA. Fadi has extensive experience in US immigration matters and is the firm’s lead in the area of US immigration. He is specialized in corporate and family immigration, as well as issues dealing with US inadmissibility.

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